East Cobb Biz Notes: Mellow Mushroom opening announced

Mellow Mushroom Johnson Ferry Road

The “Coming Soon” status of the planned Mellow Mushroom on Johnson Ferry Road has changed: The newest East Cobb location is opening Feb. 24.

The Atlanta-based pizzeria franchise announced the date on social media this morning, not long after obtaining an alcohol license and beginning hiring.

Plans have been in the works for nearly a year for Mellow Mushroom to occupy the former Common Quarter/Muss & Turner’s space at Woodlawn Square.

Sandy Plains MarketPlace sold

BisNow Atlanta has reported that the new Sandy Plains MarketPlace retail center has been sold by its developer, Fuqua Development, to the Atlanta-based Orkin & Associates real investment firm for $43.8 million.

The 73,000-square-foot center on the former site of Mountain View Elementary School has only a few businesses now—Jim ‘N Nicks BBQ, and next month, a Clean Juice location opens.

Also on tap are the first Publix GreenWise store in Georgia, Bad Daddy Burger Bar and First Watch, a breakfast franchise.

Related content

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

Gritters Library to host WorkSource Cobb Mobile Career Center

The Cobb County Public Library System is getting out word that the non-profit WorkSource Cobb Mobile Career Center will be conducting several events at Gritters Library this month.CobbWorks employment workshop series

The first session is next Thursday, Feb. 13, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and here are more details about what’s coming up:

Gritters Library is added to the MCC’s monthly schedule after years since its last visit to the library, said Jim Montgomery, WorkSourceCobb/CobbWorks MCC Coordinator.

A Resume Workshop program inside the computer lab on wheels is scheduled during the February 13th visit at 11 a.m. The MCC offers free workforce and job skills development services, wi-fi and more.

Gritters Library Manager Pamela Finley said she expects many Gritters area residents will welcome Mr. Montgomery and the MCC to the library. Gritters Library is located off Canton Road at Shaw Park in northeastern Cobb County.

“I know there is a community need for this service,” she said. “Many of the computer users at Gritters are working on resumes, job applications and job searching.”

The second February visit to Gritters Library is Thursday, February 27, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Mobile Career Center’s February schedule includes late morning and early afternoon hours at public libraries and other locations across Cobb. Resume workshops are included on select dates.

For the full February MCC schedule, visit www.worksourcecobb.org/news-events.

For information on upcoming programs at Gritters Library, visit www.cobbcat.org or call 770-528-2524.

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

East Cobb resident earns Cobb Chamber’s public service award

Susan Hampton, Cobb Chamber public service award
Susan Hampton with outgoing Cobb Chamber of Commerce president Mitch Rhoden. (Cobb C of C photo)

At its annual gala dinner Saturday, the Cobb Chamber of Commerce presented East Cobb resident Susan Hampton with its Mack Henderson Public Service Award, given to “someone who is outstanding in their commitment and dedication to enhancing the quality of life for the citizens of Cobb County.”

Hampton has organized the East Cobb Business Association’s appreciation events for Cobb Police Precinct 4 officers and Cobb Fire personnel, and is part of the newly formed Cobb County Public Safety Foundation.

Over the last year, she has been outspoken in favor of better pay and benefits for Cobb public safety workers.

In being presented the award Saturday, the Chamber called Hampton a “tireless advocate for Cobb’s public safety personnel. Whether it’s acting as a vocal supporter for higher wages or organizing an appreciation event for local law enforcement, this award winner devotes her volunteer efforts to the community she serves.”

Hampton also is active with the Cobb County Coalition of Business Associations, “working with the coalition’s founders and other committed volunteers continuing the legacy of Barbara Hickey, lending her hand whenever it is needed,” according to the Chamber’s presentation.

The Cobb Chamber also honored former U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson at the gala dinner. The Republican from East Cobb was presented with the Chamber’s Senator Johnny H. Isakson Leadership Award, which has been renamed in his honor.

The Chamber has dedicated the 10th floor of its new offices at 1100 Circle 75 Parkway in Isakson’s name.

Sen. Johnny Isakson, Cobb chamber
Retired U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson speaks at the Cobb Chamber gala dinner Saturday. (Cobb C of C photo)

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

CobbWorks holding free career workshops in January

Submitted information:CobbWorks employment workshop series

Jump start your new year’s resolution of finding a job by attending career seminars at the CobbWorks Worksource Development Center.

  • Ace Your Interview
    9-11 a.m., Friday, Jan. 17
    Learn important components to a successful interview, what research you should do beforehand and what your clothes say about you. Presented by David Perry, human services director for the Omni Hotel at the Battery Atlanta.
  • Resume Building
    9-11 a.m., Friday, Jan. 24
    Learn the keys to a powerful resume. Presented by Georgia Department of Labor staff. All attendees must register at employgeorgia.com and create a searchable resume in order to attend.
  • Skills Employers Want
    9-11 a.m., Friday, Jan. 31
    Learn the soft skills employers want most. Presented by Georgia Department of Labor staff. All attendees must register at employgeorgia.com and create a searchable resume in order to attend.

Registration for all workshops is required. To register, call 770-528-4300 or send an email to [email protected]. The workshops will be held at 463 Commerce Park Drive, Suite 100, Marietta.

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

Life Grocery and Cafe holding going out of business sale

Life Grocery Cafe going out of business

After more than 40 years in business, Life Grocery and Cafe will be closing shortly after the first of the year.

The organic foods store, located at 1453 Roswell Road in the New London Shopping Center, announced on Dec. 26 that it would be closing in January because of “declining sales due to increased competition and increasing costs” and not being able to make improvements at its facility. The following also was on the store’s Facebook page:

“Additionally, our primary distributor has been unable to consistently provide us with quality products that our customers deserve, as they prioritize fulfilling orders for the bigger stores. It has become clear that with these dynamics, along with changing market conditions and shopping culture, we cannot continue to operate our business profitably.”

The store has begun a going out of business sale that continues all through this week, with a 10 percent discount for all customers and 15 percent for store members. The hours this week are as follows.

  • Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday 10-6;
  • Tuesday 10-5;
  • Wednesday closed;
  • Sunday 12-4.

All sales are final and no checks will be accepted. Life Grocery and Cafe was founded by Life Chiropractic College students in 1976 seeking healthy eating alternatives, long before Whole Foods and other supermarkets began offering organic products.

On Sunday night, Life ownership followed up with this message:

“The kind comments on social media and in the store have been heart-warming. We have received so many stories of how we have impacted lives and even saved lives through the years. One of our sweet customers suggested that we video customers in the store with their stories. We love the idea, but the tears that go with that are just too much to bear. We have already gone through enough boxes of tissues! If you feel so inclined, we’d love you send us a video or audio clip to lif[email protected] and let us know what Life has meant to you.”

The store was able to end its lease two years early and also is selling equipment and fixtures. For inquiries call Ronnie Hudson at 770-977-9583 ext. 124 or email [email protected]

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

Top East Cobb stories for 2019: Business openings, closings

The Fresh Market East Cobb closing

A good number of retail, restaurant and service businesses opened in East Cobb during 2019, but it was the handful of closures that caught many locals by surprise.

Two of them in particular drew plenty of attention later in the fall. The Fresh Market at Woodlawn Square had a markdown sale as it closed its doors in October, and Egg Harbor Cafe shuttered in December after not being able to work out a new lease.

Read the stories

Also closing during the past year was the Loyal Q Tavern at Parkaire Landing Shopping Center and Once and Again Books on Shallowford Road.

The year 2019 was a healthy one for new fitness center openings, including Fit Body Boot Camp and SPENGA East Cobb, among others, as well as Explore Chiropractic at Parkaire.

Other new stores include The French Table and Pineapple Porch, home decor outlet, Frenchie’s Modern Nail Care and Code Ninjas, a coding school for kids.

Carwash USA, which had been located at Roswell Road and Old Canton Road, reopened at the former Wells Fargo Bank branch on Johnson Ferry Road at East Cobb Crossing Shopping Center.

Jennifer Cortez, a former manager at the now-closed Kaminsky Jewelry store on Post Oak Tritt Road, opened Jennifer Jewelers in the same spot.

The Credit Union of Georgia opened a branch on Johnson Ferry Road, and The Solana East Cobb, a senior living facility, marked the end of its first full year in business with a grand opening in November.

New restaurants and eateries in East Cobb include Jim ‘Nicks BBQ, the first business at the new Sandy Plains MarketPlace, Clean Juice at Woodlawn Square, Roll On In at Woodlawn Commons and Duck Donuts at Merchants Walk.

Perhaps the most anticipated opening—reopening, really—was the remodeled and expanded Chick-fil-A at Woodlawn Square, which was closed for several months.

Two other restaurant chains relocating to East Cobb won’t be opening until 2020. Mellow Mushroom will be taking the former Common Quarter space at Woodlawn Square, and Flying Biscuit Cafe is coming to Parkaire Landing by next spring.

Related content

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

Coach, park advocate named East Cobb Citizens of the Year

East Cobb citizens of the year
Tom Bills and Mack Cobb (center, with plaques) are joined by, from left, East Cobb Area Council president Dan Byers, Cobb Chamber CEO Sharon Mason and incoming Cobb Chamber president John Loud. (East Cobb News photos by Wendy Parker)

The new recipients of the East Cobb Citizen of the Year award have been revealed, and a long streak of keeping the news a surprise to the winners has been maintained.

At a Tuesday morning breakfast of the East Cobb Area Council of the Cobb Chamber of Commerce, Mack Cobb wore a Pope letter sweater, with a light-blue P against a backdrop of darker blue. He was asked to speak about the youth football programs he’s been involved with for nearly 50 years.

Tom Bills was part of a special presentation about the past, present and future of East Cobb Park, as the organization’s first treasurer.

Both men did that, but as the co-citizens of the year, an honor that’s been shared only once since the award began in 1991.

“I don’t know what to say,” said Cobb, holding up papers with prepared remarks. “I came here to talk about football.”

He’s coached middle-school feeder football programs for Pope, Lassiter and Walton, as well as for the Cobb YMCA.

When asked later about why he’s coached sixth-through-eighth graders for so long, his reply was swift: “They’re kids,” Cobb said, with a spark in his eyes.

A favorite moment came during a practice when a player rushed to Cobb, put something in his hand and asked him to hold onto it. It was a bloody tooth.

“I want to put it under my pillow,” the boy told Cobb.

Mack Cobb, East Cobb Citizen of the Year
Mack Cobb poses with members of the Pope community, including head football coach Tab Griffin (back row, at right), who played for him as a middle-schooler.

One of his former players was in attendance at the event at Indian Hills Country Club. Tab Griffin, who’s been the Pope varsity coach for the past three years, said Cobb’s been one of the more influential figures in his life, far beyond football.

“He always taught you so much about non-football things,” Griffin said. “Hard work. Making good grades. Respecting others. You don’t realize how much you’ve learned from him until you’re out in the real world.”

Griffin said those life lessons came every day in practice and at games, not in any overbearing fashion, but as part of developing trusting relationships with other people. That was the strength of Cobb’s influence.

“Now that I’m a father and a coach, I try to instill them with the things that I learned from him,” Cobb said.

Tom Bill, East Cobb Citizen of the Year
Tom Bills was surprised at being named the East Cobb co-Citizen of the Year, as he is presented his plaque by 1992 recipient Johny Johnson.

Bills was an engineering consultant in private practice when he got involved with efforts nearly two decades ago to buy land to purchase what became East Cobb Park.

He lives in the nearby Mitsy Forest neighborhood, and served as the first treasurer of the Friends for the East Cobb Park.

Over the years, he’s served the non-profit board in various capacities, including president from 2003-05. Now, Bills is a senior construction project manager for the Cobb Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs.

“I always thought that my award was the park,” Bills said.

He got involved in the volunteer group’s work, he said, because a park nearby “would be good for our neighborhood.”

It turned out to be a long-term commitment that included an ambitious fundraising project that continues today.

Before long, Sunny Walker, Mary Karras and Kim Paris—founding members and driving forces of the Friends group—got him fully involved, after initially asking him to evaluate an environmental impact study.

“Mary signed me up for 20 years,” he said.

He said as the organization’s treasurer, every single contribution, no matter the size, was important.

Among them were from kids who turned over big bags of change they solicited from golfers on the Indian Hills driving range.

“That meant as much to us” as the bigger checks, Bills said, “because it showed the support of the community.”

Bills’ other community work includes volunteering with activities at Walton High School, Keep Cobb Beautiful, and the Cobb Veterans Foundation.

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

East Cobb bookstore’s longevity due to ‘reinventing yourself’

Bookmiser, East Cobb bookstore
The Bookmiser store in East Cobb carries an ample supply of literary and popular fiction and has authors’ events. (East Cobb News photos by Wendy Parker)

When Annell Gerson and her husband Jim opened their first Bookmiser bookstore in Roswell in 1998, Borders was the chief competition.

That was three years after Amazon, then a little-known Seattle company, was modestly selling books online. As the Gersons expanded to open an East Cobb location on Roswell Road, the book industry would undergo profound changes.

By the time Borders went out of business in 2011 (including a store at The Avenue East Cobb), Amazon had become not just a virtual bookselling colossus but a dominant force in the online retail world.

“You just keep morphing, you just keep reinventing yourself,” said Annell Gerson on Small Business Saturday, referring to Bookmiser’s sustainability amid the changes.

It was nine years ago that American Express came up with the Small Business Saturday promotion to help small, independent retailers in the wake of Black Friday at the start of the holiday shopping season.

Bookmiser has taken part each year, and takes part in Independent Bookstore Day, the last Saturday in April. The Small Business Saturday logo adorns the store’s website, and a floor mat is situated at the checkout counter.

Gerson says the promotions are good for raising awareness long-term more than prompting same-day sales, but every little bit helps.

What started exclusively as a used bookstore with a trading program has expanded into providing required reading materials for school classes, New York Times bestsellers, special orders and authors’ events.

Every book is sold at a 20 percent discount, used or new, without any membership requirements. Bookmiser customers also get further discounts and sales offerings via the store’s e-mail newsletter, which included 25 percent off all this weekend.

“As a bookstore, you have to establish relationships with people,” Gerson said. “We know exactly what they like to read.”

The store at 3822 Roswell Road (at the eastern intersection of Robinson Road) includes a wide variety of literary and popular fiction. Many of the featured authors are what Gerson refers to as “women’s fiction,” and events at the Milton and Sandy Springs libraries feature local and national authors.

Bookmiser
New and bestselling books by featured authors are displayed in the front of the store.

Gerson said several years ago, as she was doing an event with former Congressman Tom Price, she counted up the number of bookstores in and around his north metro Atlanta base that had closed in recent years.

“Twenty-two,” she said.

Even with a focus on customer service (1-2 days for special orders to arrive, no delivery charges) and special event, the competitive challenges for indie bookstores have grown. While Bookmiser is located in an affluent, well-educated community, that’s not necessarily an advantage.

“It’s so easy to push the button,” she said, referring to Amazon. “It’s a David and Goliath story every day.”

Unlike Amazon and other online sellers, “we pay property tax. We pay school tax. We pay for air conditioning.”

And Bookmiser, like many small and independent businesses, chips in to partner with community organizations, including the Walton volleyball and baseball programs, Dance Stop, the Chattahoochee Nature Center and Curing Kids’ Cancer.

Bookmiser also took part in helping run the Milton Literary Festival until this year’s event. Last year, the Gersons closed the Roswell store (located on Sandy Plains Road near the Sandy Plains Village shopping center), and donated the last of its stock to the Friends of the Milton Library.

In 2016, Half-Price Books opened in East Cobb at the Woodlawn Square Shopping Center. While other indie book stores exist in East Cobb at the Book Exchange and the Book Nook, another used-bookstore, Once and Again Books, closed last year on Shallowford Road.

Gerson said continuing to adapt to the retail book market and customer demands are imperative. Starting in 2020, Bookmiser will gradually increase its new book stock to take up about half of the store.

“That’s what we’re seeing the community wants,” she said of the growing demand for new books. “And they want it now.”

Bookmiser is open from 10-7 Monday-Friday, 10-6 Saturday and 12-5 Sunday. Phone: (770) 509-5611.

Bookmiser

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

East Cobb Citizen of the Year to be named at Chamber breakfast

East Cobb Park

On Dec. 3, the East Cobb Area Council of the Cobb Chamber of Commerce will reveal its 2019 East Cobb Citizen of the Year at its last breakfast meeting of the year.

The event also includes a discussion about the past, present and future of East Cobb Park with founders and visionaries of the park, including Mary Karras, Kim Paris, Tom Bills and Lee O’Neal.

The breakfast is from 7:30-9 a.m. at Indian Hills Country Club (4001 Clubland Drive). The cost is $25 for Chamber members and $35 for guests. Online registration ends on Nov. 29 (click here).

Each of the area councils of the Cobb chamber honor a citizen for work in the community with the Citizen of the Year designation. Last year, the East Cobb Citizen of the Year was Brenda Rhodes of Simple Needs GA, and in 2017 the recipient was U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson.

East Cobb Park opened on Roswell Road in 2003, after years of community advocacy and the purchase of what had been farmland belonging to the Tritt family. The all-volunteer non-profit Friends for the East Cobb Park was organized for that task, and to provide programs and events and assist with maintenance of the park, which is part of the Cobb Department of Parks, Recreation and Community Affairs.

Last year, Cobb commissioners voted to spend $8.3 million in park bond funds to purchase 22 acres of adjoining Tritt property, with plans to preserve it as greenspace and eventually expand East Cobb Park.

The Friends for the East Cobb Park contributed more than $100,000 from its endowment to complete the purchase, and launched a fundraising drive. In August, the county reimbursed $90,000 to the group.

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

East Cobb Biz Scene: ECBA names business person of the year

Butch Carter, ECBA business person of the year
Butch Carter of Honest-1 Auto Care is flanked by Jim Harris, ECBA president, and Cynthia Rozzo, publisher of the EAST COBBER magazine. (ECN photo)

When Butch Carter left the corporate world after a long career in sales, he took a very different turn as a business owner.

“I didn’t have background in automotive,” said Carter, the owner of the Honest-1 Auto Care repair service in East Cobb. He wanted to run his own business, and worked with a business coach to forge his entrepreneurial path.

When Carter opened in the fall of 2013 at a former Napa store on East Cobb Drive (behind where the Trader Joe’s is now located) Carter sought to fulfill the franchise’s promise “to build long-term relationships and give back to the community.”

Carter was named the 2019 business person of the year last week by the East Cobb Business Association, which honored him during a luncheon (that included an East Cobb cityhood debate) at the Olde Towne Athletic Club.

It’s the second year for the award, whose inaugural winner was Cynthia Rozzo, publisher of the EAST COBBER magazine.

A native of North Carolina, Carter was an intelligence officer in the U.S. Air Force, then earned an MBA before entering the business world.

Carter had been a pharmaceutical sales representative for Pfizer, Otsuka and Stryker Medical and a sales manager for Axcan/Aptalis Pharma, with a personal business philosophy “that if you treat your customers right, you’re going to be successful.”

While Carter has taken that approach with him as a business owner, he credited his “phenomenal front desk staff. They’re the face of the business.” Those involved in the customer service aspect of Honest-1, he said, “are the driving force behind the success of our business.”

Carter has opened a second Honest-1 location in Johns Creek, and in East Cobb he has plunged into community service work. He’s a member of the Rotary Club of East Cobb, and he’s involved his business in projects that include more than 25 organizations.

Honest-1 has held a cookout for veterans in association with East Cobb-based United Military Care (more here about the work of this organization), has contributed to the food pantry at Brumby Elementary School and benefitted the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Carter also is a big believer in supporting other local businesses in East Cobb, using many of them for vendors for a variety of functions, including marketing, social media and website management.

The other finalists for the ECBA’s business person of the year are Cindy Trow, a health coach with Wellness Now, Ann Lafferty of Rakers Junk Removal, and Tom Gonter, the development director for MUST Ministries.

Righteous Que on the MoveRighteous Que Moving Sign

The Righteous Que BBQ restaurant in the Piedmont Commons Shopping Center (1050 E. Piedmont Road) has outgrown its tiny space, and is in the process of moving three doors down, where El Taco Mexican recently closed.

A sign on the Righteous Que door notes it will be closed this week while the move is in progress, and they’re taking applications for the expanded business.

Roll On In Sets Opening Date

The first day of business for Roll On In Sushi Burrito & Bowls at Woodlawn Point (1100 Johnson Ferry Road, Suite 365) will be Saturday, Dec. 7. The Asian concept franchise is owned by East Cobb residents Monte and Suzanne Petty Jump. You can track the progress at the store’s Facebook page.

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

East Cobb Business Association cityhood forum limited to 250

Some more details on next Tuesday’s East Cobb Business Association forum on the subject of East Cobb cityhood that we first noted a couple weeks ago:East Cobb Business Association cityhood forum

The ECBA says that to ensure you get a seat, you must make a reservation online, ideally by Sunday, when the cost goes up.

The forum featuring representatives from the Committee for Cityhood in East Cobb and the anti-cityhood East Cobb Alliance is part of the ECBA’s monthly luncheon event, from 11-1 on Nov. 12 at the Olde Towne Athletic Club (4950 Olde Towne Parkway).

Seating will be limited to the first 250 people (most ECBA luncheons are around 100) who register and pay online. You can pay at the door, but the cost does go up and there’s no guarantee you’ll be able to get in.

Jen Starks of the ECBA said 78 people have registered thus far.

This is the only time pro- and anti-cityhood groups have appeared together in a forum-style event; the cityhood group is having a town hall meeting on Nov. 11 at Wheeler High School.

The advance registration cost (click here to sign up) is $20 for ECBA members and $25 for guests. After midnight Sunday and up to the door, the respective costs are $25 and $30.

The same event will honor the ECBA’s 2019 business person of the year, which was started last year. The finalists are:

  • Cindy Trow, health coach, Wellness Now
  • Tom Gonter, development officer, MUST Ministries
  • Butch Carter, owner, Honest-1 Auto Care East Cobb
  • Ann Lafferty, owner, Rakers Junk Removal

NCBA Events

The Northeast Cobb Business Association is holding two events this month, a Nov. 14 Alive After Five networking event from 5:30-8:30 p.m. at the Governor’s Gun Club (1005 Cobb Place Blvd., Kennesaw) that’s free to attend with registration.

The NCBA monthly luncheon is Nov. 20 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Piedmont Church (570 Piedmont Road), and the guest speaker is Sharon Mason, CEO of the Cobb Chamber of Commerce. For details and to sign up, click here.

East Cobb Citizen of the Year breakfast

On Dec. 3 the East Cobb Area Council of the Cobb Chamber of Commerce will  have its annual East Cobb Citizen of the Year breakfast.

Last year’s winner was Brenda Rhodes of Simple Needs GA, and the award goes to individuals who demonstrate exceptional leadership and community service.

The breakfast is from 7:30-9 a.m. at Indian Hills Country Club (4001 Clubland Drive). The cost is $25 for Chamber members and $25 for guests. To sign up, click here.

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

The Fresh Market announces East Cobb store closing sale

The Fresh Market East Cobb closing

Following up last week’s story about The Fresh Market closing in East Cobb: Here’s what’s posted at the store entrance now.

All sales of beer and wine are 25 percent off and 30 percent off everything else; all sales are final.

The special closing sale hours are 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. The tentative closing date is Nov. 18.

(1205 Johnson Ferry Road, Suite 109)

Related story

 

Get Our Free E-Mail Newsletter!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the upcoming week in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to sign up, and you’re good to go!

%d bloggers like this: